Poly-Fastener

Poly-Fastener

Poly-Fastener

DESCRIPTION: In the mid-sixties, commercial glass greenhouses began the conversion to a new covering called “blow film polyethylene.” Succeeding due to its efficiency, lower cost profile and the high-cost of maintenance attached to traditional glass-and-window-pane greenhouses, the new design would take the agricultural world by storm. But it was not without issue.

CHALLENGE: Walter Curry was surely not the first to notice how constantly the new poly-covering was ending up torn and unsecured. This was due to the accepted method of affixing poly to greenhouse frames: a lath (a thin strip of wood) and nails. As nails were driven through the lath and into the poly it made small punctures in the poly while accelerating the rotting of the wood greenhouse frame. This created a weak spot, allowing natural forces such as wind or heavy rain to tear along the nail point.

CURRY INNOVATION: Curry recognized a method of gripping the poly without tearing or puncturing it was a necessity. He tested dozens of ideas and made working prototypes, eventually settling on the edge of a wash pail due to its “perfect curve on top edge.” He had created a crude – but working – model of what would become the Curry Poly-Fastener.

RESULT: Poly-Fastener became the industry standard for small to mid-size greenhouse operations with Curry Industries selling more than 16 million profile extrusions to date.